Geophysics
Seismic and Infrasound Studies

Seismic and infrasound studies provide many of the most insightful and quantitative insights into internal structure and eruption physics of volcanoes. Infrasonic research at Mt. Erebus is currently being conducted by Jeff Johnson and Rick Aster at NMT.

Visit the infrasound site of professor Jeff Johnson and his students to learn more about infrasonic monitoring of active volcanoes.

References

Rowe, C., Aster, R., Kyle, P., Dibble, R., Schlue, J., Seismic and Acoustic Observations at Mount Erebus Volcano, Ross Island, Antarctica, 1994-1998, J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 101, 105-128, 2000.

Johnson, J., Aster, R., Kyle, P., Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound, Geop. Res. Lett., 31, L14604, doi:10.1029/2004GL020020, 2004.

Johnson, J., Aster, R., Volcanic acoustic efficiency of Strombolian eruptions, Geop. Res. Lett., 31, 14, p.L14604, 2005.

Jones K., Johnson J.B., Aster R., Kyle P., McIntosh, W., Infrasonic tracking of large bubble bursts and ash venting at Erebus volcano, Antarctica. J. Volc. Geotherm. Res., doi:10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2008.02.001, 2008.

Johnson, J.B., Aster R., Jones, K., Kyl,e P., McIntosh, W., Acoustic Source Characterization of Impulsive Strombolian Eruptions from the Mount Erebus Lava Lake. J. Volc. Geotherm. Res., doi:10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2008.06.028, 2008.

 
Variable Tremor
Variable Tremor

Variable tremor recorded on November 29, 2003 at the ABB short-period vertical seismic station. The event begins with a chaotic interval, followed by an impulsive low frequency event. Harmonic tremor follows, gliding first to high frequencies, then back to low. The event ends with faint harmonics. This audio record is sped up by a factor of 100 relative to the actual seismic signal.

 
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